Distribution

Getting all the relevant, bookable inventory in front of business travelers is a never-ending challenge. Airlines, hotels and other suppliers constantly tinker with their products and pricing, and usually favor direct distribution over more costly third-party channels. That creates complexity in business travel technology.

Some examples of our coverage
• Commissions and other remuneration
• Industry rules of thumb and trade secrets from the US Airways v. Sabre and U.S. v. Sabre trials
• Such newer concepts as New Distribution Capability and personalization

Sabre Readies TruTrip To Handle Open Bookings, But At What Cost?

Sabre is nearly ready to commercialize its answer to managed travel program leakage. First announced in summer 2013, TruTrip is meant to commingle records on travel reservations made outside designated channels with those booked within. Like with Concur’s TripLink and some niche tools, the idea is to provide a complete picture of travel plans to travelers, their program managers and their agencies. To…

Corporate Booking Tool NexTravel Takes Off With Work To Do

With some in the corporate market craving options, tech blogs last month announced the arrival of corporate booking tool NexTravel. While oversights and hyperbole are not uncommon for start-ups, NexTravel may have a bigger issue. It doesn’t have a deal in place with Southwest Airlines, which is investigating its presence on the site. The airline…

Amadeus, Lufthansa ‘Personalizing’ Benefits For Corporate Accounts

Personalization. It’s not just for people anymore. Lufthansa is using Amadeus technology to offer product and service add-ons to passengers based on where they work rather than who they are. The capability applies in direct and indirect channels, including travel management companies that use Amadeus or integrate using Web services. Negotiated discounts are not the…

What Does Expedia’s New Power Mean For Lodging Rates?

Hotels had to reckon with Expedia before it acquired Travelocity and proposed the same for Orbitz. If it’s able to enhance its negotiating power, Expedia could reinforce the notion that online travel agencies offer lower lodging rates than traditional managed travel sources. In a Feb. 13 research note, Oppenheimer analyst Manish Hemrajani wrote that Expedia’s “Hulk-esque proportions…

U.S. Market Challenges KDS

A leading provider to European companies and multinationals, 20-year-old travel and expense automator KDS is a new entrant in the United States. Some are pulling for it as an alternative to Concur. It has opportunity, but KDS also faces a lot of challenges. KDS CEO Dean Forbes in a Feb. 5 interview acknowledged that the Neo door-to-door travel booking product so far…

In North America Push, Amadeus E-Travel Signs Southwest

Amadeus confirmed plans to boost its e-Travel Management corporate booking tool in North America. It’s starting with a “multi-year” deal struck this month to access Southwest Airlines inventory and fares “in the coming months.” The carrier also would be available worldwide in e-Travel and the Amadeus i:FAO cytric booking tool and mobile app popular in Germany. The…

Years Of Consolidation Gave Concur Market Power, But No Monopoly

You may have read that as SAP swallows Concur, business travel innovation goes down with it. This is absurd. Concur is much more an expense management software company than a business travel company. Is it innovative? Yes, but that’s not how it got its travel cred. Concur has no monopoly on ingenuity and now, perhaps…

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